Tag Archives: Ubuntu

How to watch Amazon Prime Videos in Ubuntu 14.04 or Newer

Amazon Prime Videos now rely on one of two things: 1. a browser that supports HTML5 video player, or 2. Silverlight being installed on the system and a browser that is compatible with it.

If you’re using Ubuntu and running Firefox you may see the following when attempting to watch Prime Videos:

Amazon Video: Browser Not Supported

Until Firefox fully supports HTML5 video player (and whatever other features Amazon requires — click to see Amazon Video System Requirements), it probably wont work. It works in Firefox on Windows if you have Silverlight installed, but Silverlight being a Microsoft product, does not play well with Linux/Ubuntu.

So what can you do?

# Install Google Chrome

There are a few different ways to install Chrome, but I like to use the PPA (at least until it gets added into the main Ubuntu repos).

  1. Open your terminal and enter the following lines of code…
  2. Add Key: (this should all be on one line, including the – at the end)
    wget -q -O - https://dl-ssl.google.com/linux/linux_signing_key.pub | sudo apt-key add -
  3. Set repository: (this should all be on one line)
    sudo sh -c 'echo "deb http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google.list'
  4. Install package: (this should all be on one line)
    sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install google-chrome-stable

# Watch Amazon Prime Videos in Chrome

Now Chrome is installed and should update whenever you update your system (provided there is an update available for Chrome). Go ahead and open Chrome and go find your favorite video on Amazon Prime and enjoy.

 

Note: I’m updating this post from one I wrote over a year ago. If you want to read the old post you still can. I kept it below in a hidden div.

# Disclaimer

Don’t do any of this if you don’t know what the commands do. I cannot be responsible for what happens to your computer as a result of your attempt to follow this tutorial. By using this guide you acknowledge that I’m just trying to help describe what process I used to get it to work on my computer and offering it as feedback to anyone else attempting to accomplish the same thing.

Upgrade/Install Firefox 4 in Ubuntu 10.10 (or whatever)

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Firefox and Ubuntu
Firefox and Ubuntu

I’ve received a few questions about this one, so I thought I should put it up here for everyone to see. Note: If you are just looking for the quick solution, skip to the end, otherwise keep reading for the question and answer stuff.

The question is: “How can I install Firefox 4 on Ubuntu 10.10? I tried doing the usual update but it was just a minor update of 3.6, so what gives?”

The answer is: Ubuntu 11.04 will come packaged with Firefox 4 by default, but because of the way Ubuntu does things (I’m trying to keep it simple here), they try to stick with the same version of most programs and only do updates for that. Newer versions will be included in newer releases of Ubuntu. They do this to make sure they have time to test everything and make sure there are no conflicts. It may be frustrating, but you have the option to work around it, and if you’re honest with yourself you’ll admit it is fair and reasonable for them to do as they do.

Now, if you want to have the latest and greatest versions of your favorite programs/applications (like Firefox), then you might want to become familiar with PPA’s. I know I’ve posted some things about them in the past, but never really mentioned anything specific about the PPA part of it. PPA’s are basically an alternate source of applications that are managed by the developers. You can add PPA’s to your sources list just like you would repositories (as they are just that, repositories) and have more frequent updates for your favorite programs, and even programs that are not included in the official repositories by Ubuntu. Note: a word of caution: if you are willing to add a bunch of PPA’s, be prepared as you may encounter bugs from time to time as the newest versions of various programs/applications are not necessarily tested as thoroughly as Ubuntu developers would do when preparing for a new OS release.

OK here’s what you need to do:

Open Terminal (are you getting used to this yet? Applications->Accessories->Terminal) and enter the following code:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mozillateam/firefox-stable
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade

or if you prefer, you can do it all in one line of code:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mozillateam/firefox-stable && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade


Update:
Forgot to mention that you will need to restart Firefox to notice the changes, and it will likely ask you to update/upgrade your addons at that time.

If for some reason you are running into a problem, let me know and I’ll try to help you out, but you really should be all set with the above.

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How to: Initiate a Timed Shutdown

On Friday I was downloading some files on my Netbook (running Ubuntu Remix 10.04) and was not planning to stick around for the downloads to finish (it was already close to 7pm, I needed to get home for the weekend). I didn’t want to leave it running all weekend and I still had another hour to go before my downloads finished…
What to do?

Well I decided to initiate a delayed shutdown of my system. Since the downloads had about 1hr and 15 minutes left, I decided to be extra safe and set the shutdown for an extra 30 minutes after that… Here’s how I did it:

In your terminal, run the following command:

sudo shutdown -h 20:45 "See you on Monday!"

you can change the time to fit your needs and change the message (between the quotes) to whatever you like or leave it out as the message is optional.

You could also set it to shutdown by using a slightly different format, like this:

sudo shutdown -h +120 "Shutting down in 2hrs -- or 120 minutes"

This works on Linux and Mac. If you want to do this on Windows you could try something like this (if you are an admin):

at 20:45 shutdown /l /r /y /c

But I cannot vouch for how effective this will be (on Windows I mean) as it may only shutdown the OS not the machine/computer…

Lexmark x1240 meet Ubuntu – play nice

I have an old Lexmark 3-in-one scanner/copier/printer and it’s been sitting on my desk collecting dust. I finally had a use for it today as I needed to scan something. I know that Lexmark printers are notorious for being unfriendly to Linux, so I did some searching before plugging the printer in.

Everywhere I looked showed that there is no scanning support for the Lexmark as they refuse to release any source code for their print drivers, and the only binaries they offer are for print functionality only.

Well I remembered that I had previously installed XSane (though for some reason I cannot remember why), so I figured I’d just mess around and see what happens.

I plugged in the Lexmark X1240 to my USB port and right away XSane kicked into gear! It gave me two options: eithe I just plugged in a camera or a scanner. Obviously it was the latter. I clicked scanner and bingo! I was in business! I hit scan and like magic it was done in no time!

The default file format is pnm so I just converted to png and I was done!

I’ll try to put pics up later.